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Here’s what it means if a yellow ribbon is tied to a dog’s harness or collar

That yellow ribbon tied to the dog’s collar isn’t just a cute accessory.

This tiny little ribbon actually signifies something that might just protect you or others.

Although if you don’t know what it means you’re about to find out.

This yellow ribbon signifies a dog who needs space.

The Yellow Dog Project is a global educational movement that uses the yellow color to identify dogs who need a little extra space or that might not like being touched or talked to.

This movement assists dog owners from unwanted situations and is promoting appropriate contact with others.

So if you see a dog out in the park with something like a yellow ribbon, collar, or just a yellow accessory in general, I would proceed carefully.

What conditions constitute a yellow ribbon for your furry friend?

Just because a dog needs space doesn’t always mean they are actually aggressive.

There are plenty of reasons why a dog might need space. Most often it can be due to health issues, surgery, anxiety, or even just straight-up training.

By relaying this specific message with the ribbon protects the dog’s personal space and can even help lessen their symptoms.

We’ve all seen that adorable dog in the park.

Let’s face it animals are adorable. People who like animals will typically want to interact with them when they see them.

This rings especially true when you see a really cute dog nearby. It’s not uncommon for strangers to approach dogs without even thinking if they might respond negatively.

A lot of the time that negative reaction is out of the owner’s control.

Taking any type of medicine whether it’s human or dog has the chance of causing unwanted side effects.

This is especially true for hormonal treatments or steroids with dogs.

It’s pretty common for owners with a dog on steroids to notice a change in their behavior.

According to the Yellow Dog Project, it’s been reported that half of the owners with dogs on steroids have lost self-control very easily.

Other side effects can make dogs even feel anxious, depressed, or possibly aggressive. Effects of steroids can last up to even a few weeks after treatment.

This movement helps manage and lessen anxiety for dogs.

When a dog feels anxious and they are triggered it can cause them to react in possibly harmful ways.

As an owner being aware of these triggers can be incredibly helpful in managing the anxiety, but every dog is different.

The Yellow Dog Project establishes a safe space for human-dog interactions to take place.

By providing this space it can greatly reduce psychological stress and protect strangers from the chance of dog aggression to take place.

How do you properly greet a dog?

There are actually specific techniques you can use to approach an unfamiliar dog safely.

A lot of the time animals can misinterpret body language.

If they perceive our actions to be scary or aggressive that’s when the dog might respond with unsafe behavior.

The 3 Dos when approaching a dog.

There are 3 points to keep in mind when approaching that unfamiliar fluff.

The first is eye contact; Never look at their eyes because for dogs direct eye contact might be perceived as aggression.

The next is voice and noise. Dogs are able to hear way better than the human ear can.

Therefore you should speak softly and slowly. If you are loud or startling upon the approach it could easily trigger aggression or scare the dog.

Last is body position.

You always want to approach a dog slowly. It can help to bend down making you appear more closer to dog size.

Standing up fully can be intimidating and scary for many dogs leading to the possibility of an unwanted situation.

Now you know yellow means caution for dogs too.

Next time you see that adorable dog you just can’t help but pet remember to take a second and watch the dog before approaching.

Dog owners use all sorts of ways to help identify their pet’s issues when in public. Make sure to look! You never know they might have a yellow ribbon on and now you know exactly what to do.

For more information, you can visit The Yellow Dog Project on Facebook.

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